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Mental Health

Mental Health, Running

Let’s Talk Prenatal Depression – It’s More Common Than You Know

Note: So, heads up to the males reading this blog post. This is a post about prenatal depression. Generally, I like to keep topics on Still I Run relevant for both genders, but I really felt the need to speak about this depression during pregnancy. It’s something that the women in your life can experience, but it’s a topic that’s talked about even less than just “normal” mental health. Even though this topic has to do with pregnancy, I hope you’ll stick  ...

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Guest Writer, Mental Health, Running

Learning to manage my anxiety and panic attacks with running

Michael was one of the very first people to like us on Facebook and he’s been such a great cheerleader for the cause ever since! He’s always passing along awesome videos and articles about mental health my way AND he even tattoo’d the Run Arrows design on his leg. I’m so in awe at Michael’s tenacity and will to run no matter what. I hope you enjoy his journey with running and mental health as much as I do! Thank you, Michael! I started running in August of 2012  ...

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Guest Writer, Mental Health

Kristle Lowell – Let’s Get Rid of the Stigma Around Taking Medication

On a regular basis, Still I Run ambassador Kristle Lowell shares with us her journey with mental health. Kristle is a World Champion Trampoline Gymnast who deals with her anxiety and depression in the public eye. Here’s her most recent post about the shame and stigma surrounding medication for mental health. Almost every mental health patient who takes medication has lived this moment. We look over at the clock and realize it’s time to take our medication. So we slip away to the  ...

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Mental Health

What Is Psychiatric Name Calling and How Do We Stop It?

Crazy. Pyscho. Lunatic. Disturbed. Nuts. Looney. These are all words we hear and use for any number of reasons. Sometimes we wield them as barbs to hurt people. In other cases we use them to label events, people or situations we don’t understand.  Or we use those terms as a derogatory way to characterize people with a mental health condition. But, for the most part, a lot of these words are used pretty flippantly and without much regard. “There’s something wrong with her.  ...

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